I’m Not Your Friend, Buddy

When I hear the word Buddy, three things come to mind.  (Well, four things, but let’s not go there.)

The first is Buddy Holly.  The thing is, I don’t know much about Buddy Holly other than the obvious.  I also haven’t seen Buddy The Musical (although I believe it’s pretty good) so can’t really comment on that.

The second is a song by Weezer called (you maybe guessed it) Buddy Holly.

The third is the Canada On Strike episode of South Park that spawned an exchange that ran something along the lines of:

-I’m not your friend, buddy.
-I’m not your buddy, pal.
-I’m not your pal, guy.
-I’m not your guy, friend.
-I’m not your friend, pal.
-I’m not your pal, buddy.

I know I have some Canadian readers and I’m still not really sure what the cultural reference is so I’ll leave that there!

Being honest, I enjoy South Park when I watch it but it’s not something I watch by appointment and it’s not something that I’ll series link on my Sky+.  When I was working 95 hour weeks, Comedy Central and South Park used to see me through till the early hours when it was actually a useful aid to concentration to have a lot going on while finishing off the day’s activities.

The thing I like about South Park is how close to the bone is gets.  Nothing and no-one is off limits to be offended, but it’s not always the direct reference that’s called out, rather people’s and society’s reaction to it.  For example, in Douche and Turd there were obvious references to the US Presidential Election of 2004 where many saw both John Kerry and George W Bush as rubbish candidates.  A little deeper, though, there was another challenge to a socially accepted mandate that it is one’s duty to vote.

I remember one sketch by Billy Connolly which I haven’t been able to find since, where he speaks about there being only one demographic in society that it is impossible to offend – the middle aged white man.  While most people will read that and think that he was calling out people of different races and genders, that was only part of it.  He was also calling out the lethargy and acceptance of all things rubbish by the stereotypical middle aged white man.

People’s ability to get offended nowadays never ceases to amaze me.  Of course, there are some proper and reasonable justifications to get well and truly miffed by things.  There are also instances, though, where someone hasn’t meant to offend or upset but has accidentally.  I’ve had examples of this myself, once where I told someone I was going to be off-grid for a few hours in a place with no phone signal only for this person to fly off the handle because they had allegedly been stuck inside the house for 10 straight days working (despite having told me that they were at a restaurant a few days prior) and would love to be out themselves.

It would be remiss of me to take all the blame off the offender in those instances where they can act with more sensitivity, but it is also in those exact same instances where I think we sometimes need to look at ourselves and find out why we’re offended.  This would push us to not only think about and challenge accepted norms but to also challenge ourselves.  All too often we can believe that it’s only our opinion that matters, especially when we take offence.

That’s kinda what Weezer were getting at.  Do I think we’ll get there? Maybe, but that’ll (probably) be the day when I die!

What’s with these homies, dissing my girl?
Why do they gotta front?
What did we ever do to these guys
That made them so violent?
Woo-hoo, but you know I’m yours.
Woo-hoo, and I know you’re mine.
Woo-hoo, and that’s for all time.

Oo-ee-oo I look just like Buddy Holly,
Oh-oh, and you’re Mary Tyler Moore.
I don’t care what they say about us anyway,
I don’t care bout that.

Don’t you ever fear, I’m always near.
I know that you need help.
Your tongue is twisted, your eyes are slit,
You need a guardian.
Woo-hoo, and you know I’m yours.
Woo-hoo, and I know you’re mine.
Woo-hoo, and that’s for all time.

Oo-ee-oo I look just like Buddy Holly,
Oh-oh, and you’re Mary Tyler Moore.
I don’t care what they say about us anyway,
I don’t care bout that.
I don’t care bout that.

Bang, bang a knock on the door.
Another big bang and you’re down on the floor.
Oh no! What do we do?
Don’t look now but I lost my shoe –
I can’t run and I can’t kick.
What’s a matter babe are you feeling sick?
What’s a matter, what’s a matter, what’s a matter you?
What’s a matter babe, are you feeling blue? Oh-oh!
And that’s for all time,
And that’s for all time.

Oo-ee-oo I look just like Buddy Holly,
Oh-oh, and you’re Mary Tyler Moore.
I don’t care what they say about us anyway,
I don’t care bout that.
I don’t care bout that.
I don’t care bout that.
I don’t care bout that.

Buddy Holly by Weezer

Comments 2

  1. Great post! I love the point you raise about South Park, in a much milder form, the Simpsons does the same kind of thing. It amazes me how many people can completely miss the deeper, though provoking messages encompassed in these programs! I personally think they are very cleverly put together.

    • They are very cleverly put together – for 23 years! I couldn’t believe that when I read it doing my “research”. The Simpsons is a little more subtle, although I do remember the one with the comet about to hit Springfield because the bill that would have provided evacuation wasn’t passed due to a random pledge of money for them not to do it.

      Thanks for checking out the post!

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