The Forbidden Experiment

I’ve always viewed The Forbidden Experiment a bit like That Shakespeare Play.  Everyone knows it happens, but you’re not allowed to talk about directly.

For those who don’t know, The Forbidden Experiment is used to describe the ultimate Nature vs Nurture experiment.  Take a child, provide it with nothing but what it needs to survive and see how it develops.  I’ve seen it mentioned in relation to a child abandoned on the Firth of Forth and I’ve seen it mentioned in line with an experiment to establish the true language of God.

It’s all interesting thoughts.  Theoretically, without interaction language wouldn’t exist but one would think that there might be an innate form of communication there anyway.  We probably all kind of know what should happen, whether we’ve been influenced by films or just put some thought in to it.  However, no-one really knows because all the instances that have occurred allegedly by accident have been uncontrolled.

The Nature vs Nurture debate is different though, because theories abound near daily on the latest trait or characteristic to have proven links to either our genes or our environment.  This is probably seeing the two as a pure dichotomy which possibly fails to ask the right questions.  It should be about what we can do to get information and gain new knowledge. What variations can be found in the same DNA?  To extent can behaviour and physiology be influenced?

It’s still one of those subjects that hurts my brain, like when I think about what happens after Space ends!  I believe that there’s a pre-disposition to things but it’s wrong to think that the environment can’t have any effect on it.  And if physical things can be influenced, how does that work alongside non-tangibles – soulmates, fate and destiny?

Our love is forbidden
That just makes me want you more
I keep it all hidden
My in-laws would treat me like an outlaw
But I don’t think I can just sit and watch
From afar
Something as beautiful as you are
Forbidden Love
Oh you shouldn’t have forbade it
‘cos if this is
Forbidden Love
I won’t rest until I’ve made it
If you hadn’t made a rule to break
I might just have obeyed it
Might just have obeyed it
For a while
I tell myself that I’ve moved on
But I’m still crazy about you
And just because I’m not allowed
Doesn’t mean that I don’t want to
I don’t think I can just be your mate
Any more

Hell is the truth learned too late
If you didn’t want
Forbidden Love
Oh you shouldn’t have forbade it
‘cos if this is
Forbidden Love
I won’t rest until I’ve made it
If you hadn’t made a rule to break
I might just have obeyed it
For a while
Forbidden Love
Oh you shouldn’t have forbade it
‘cos if this is
Forbidden Love
I won’t rest until I’ve made it
If you hadn’t made a rule to break
I might just have obeyed it
For a while
Forbidden Love
Forbidden Love
Forbidden Love
Forbidden Love

Forbidden Love by The Darkness

 

Comments 3

  1. Fantastic post. You’ve probably heard about the case of Genie, the girl that was found shackled to a bed for thirteen years. Obviously, an experiment like would be draconian and nefariously unethical to replicate, but the case study provided interesting research on language and its development in us from childhood. You’re also absolutely right, there’s no one answer to this question — and thankfully psychologists and other researchers are slowly weaning away from the dichotomous aspect of it and gradually adopting it’s understanding as an obvious Gordian knot. It’s got a bit of this and a bit of that, and to be honest, I personally don’t think the percentages each one plays provides that much significance, I think what should be made important is how potent can one be over the other, with respect to the fact that this could change from one person to the other.

    • I hadn’t heard about Genie actually. Just read about her now. The thing that piqued my interest was when I saw the word “rehabilitation”. The point of the Forbidden Experiment is that there is no “re” about it!

      • Yes I understand what you mean! I think what makes rehabilitation even more fascinating is how it sheds light on the adaptability of our minds and bodies. It’s crazy to think that something I haven’t done for thirteen years could be accomplished through rehabilitation. The human brain is great. And the forbidden experiment sounds a little frightening.

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