Feeling The Music

Music has different ways of resonating with different people.

I was sat in an Apres bar a few weeks ago listening to what was playing, screenshotting the tracks as Shazam told me what these often bizarre compositions actually were.

Obviously everyone has their own taste, but I’ve never been able to really feel dance music (he says as a sweeping generalisation).  I understand that some people can hear a beat and feel the urge to dance because I can feel a beat in a song and feel the need to jump and up and down and bob my head.

One of the key elements for me is lyrics.  It was while listening to the following in the bar that I started thinking about numbers things…

Johnny Däpp!
Däpp, Däpp, Däpp, Johnny Däpp, Däpp
Johnny, Johnny Däpp, Däpp, Däpp, Johnny Däpp, Däpp
Johnny, Johnny Däpp, Däpp, Däpp, Johnny Däpp, Däpp
Johnny, Johnny Däpp, Däpp, Däpp, Johnny Däpp, Däpp
Johnny, Johnny Däpp, Däpp, Däpp, Johnny Däpp, Däpp
Johnny, Johnny Däpp, Däpp, Däpp, Johnny Däpp, Däpp
Johnny, Johnny Däpp, Däpp, Däpp, Johnny Däpp, Däpp
Johnny, Johnny Däpp, Däpp, Däpp, Johnny Däpp, Däpp

Struck me as a place filler, just like some of the most famous lyrics of the past decade:

But it’s not forever
But it’s just tonight
Oh we’re still the greatest
The greatest
The greatest
You
Your sex is on fire
You
Your sex is on fire

“Sex On Fire” were not supposed to be the lyrics of the final song.  Kings of Leon put them in there while they worked on the rest of the song.  It could also be about herpes.

Wretch 32 was quoted in the Independent as writing about “the frustrations of life. Being a teenager, not knowing what you wanted to be, where you wanted to be.”  He came up with:

Choo choo go hard go faster, stack p’s everyday
I ride this motherfucking beat like a tractor.

I don’t get it, but I’m sure some people do.

The thing with all those lyrics quotes is that they grant artistic licence to not always make sense or mean anything but to work with the song to be greater than the sum of the parts.  Some lyrics do make sense though, and that’s what started me thinking about what happens if the lyrics were not in inverted commas and centered and in bigger writing?  If we just said them, would they achieve the greatness of the songs?

For example, and maybe you have to read these out loud:

The word was on the street that the fire in your heart is out.  I’m sure you’ve heard it all before, but you never really had a doubt.  I don’t believe that anybody feels the way I do about you now.  And all the roads we have to walk are winding, and all the lights that lead us there are blinding.  There are many things that I would like to say to you but I don’t know how because, maybe, you’re gonna be the one that saves me.  And after all, you’re my wonderwall.

But I would walk 500 miles and I would walk 500 more just to be the man who walks a thousand miles to fall down at your door.

If a double-decker bus crashes in to us, to die by your side is such a heavenly way to die. And if a ten ton truck kills the both of us, to die by your side, well the pleasure, the privilege is mine. Oh, there is a light and it never goes out.

Three different quotes from three fairly different songs, but three classic songs.  Said out loud as part of a conversation, would they be overly dramatic? Certainly more dramatic than when put to music with the artistry and acceptance of Morrissey in that sense at least!

And that’s why I love music, because it sometimes lets you say things that you otherwise wouldn’t be able to.

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